Kitchen and Bathroom Win for Waste Production

We continued to produce quite a bit of garbage this week – 2 pounds, 15 ounces worth. That doesn’t count the things that will be recycled next week. We’ll count them before we set them out.

The majority of waste came from two rooms: the kitchen and the bathroom.

    The heaviest amount of kitchen waste was compostable, and most of that could be composted on site. We are part of the City of Mpls composting pilot program so we sent 8 ounces of compostable packaging went to the city. We had no meat or dairy waste this week, or that would have gone to the city, too.
    The next batch of kitchen waste was plastic. It’s just impossible to get away from it! I bought canning jars and they come in boxes wrapped in plastic! I bought juice and I can choose a plastic twist or a plastic spout. This week I replaced a broken plastic ice cube tray and a broken plastic whisk because I found unbroken items at a garage sale. At least I didn’t have to buy new plastic wrapped in plastic!

As for bathroom waste – ALERT, SENSITIVE MATERIAL AHEAD, NOT FOR THE SQUEAMISH:

    I bought an over-the-counter medication that is only sold in a very small plastic tube glued to a large piece of cardboard and covered in plastic. Ugh, hate it.
    And then there’s feminine hygiene products. I’ve written about this before on my other blog so I’m going to link to that post on alternatives to pads. Cloth and diva cups save A LOT of money and a lot of waste over time but they don’t work for every woman at all times. There are eco-friendly, compostable pads on the market, which I hadn’t noticed until now – and I hadn’t thought about how to compost such a product until now. (Challenges have a way of helping you think through things like this.) Grist blogger, Ask Umbria, says to use a worm bin. I realize I’ve got some investigating to do.
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One thought on “Kitchen and Bathroom Win for Waste Production

  1. Further study of the waste waved by not purchasing new items and instead buying reusables, such as your “new” kitchen utensils is an interesting idea. Could it be too outside of the box to think about garage sales on a large scale?? Maybe we don’t have to have JUST new things for sale at stores like Target or grocery stores. Maybe there are retailers (large or small) that on a more consistent basis provided clean, but used goods. We already see this with consignment and furniture, but why not more with other items as well.

    To push some of your thoughts a little further, are there additional reasons you can think of that would inspire manufacturer’s to reduce the plastic waste they include in their packaging? Who would it be helpful to have at meeting three to talk through some of these ideas?

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